Col. Alexander B. Andrews “Hero” of the WNC Railroad & Haunted Tours hosted by the Swannanoa Valley Museum and History Center

In just a couple of weeks, the Swannanoa Valley Museum and History Center will feature their annual haunted house tours! This event is always a blast as costumed actors guide visitors through a large home decked out with historical decorations while they view scenes from before, during, and after the building of the WNC railroad. … Continue reading Col. Alexander B. Andrews “Hero” of the WNC Railroad & Haunted Tours hosted by the Swannanoa Valley Museum and History Center

Review: R. Douglas Hurt’s Agriculture and the Confederacy

  Hurt, R. Douglas. Agriculture and the Confederacy: policy, Productivity, and Power in the Civil War South.  (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015) 364 pp. $45.00.      At the onset of the Civil War, the Confederate Leadership and citizenry remained confident in their ability to feed their newly independent nation and win a … Continue reading Review: R. Douglas Hurt’s Agriculture and the Confederacy

Racin’ on the River: The Gentrification of Asheville Motor Speedway

“It was like racin’ an airplane through a shopping mall,”[i] remembered Charley Brown, the winner of the Billy Joe Pressley Memorial. It was the last race held at Asheville Motor Speedway. NASCAR, the National Association of Stock Car Automobile Racing, made its way to Asheville, North Carolina in 1951.[ii] NASCAR was nothing new to the … Continue reading Racin’ on the River: The Gentrification of Asheville Motor Speedway

Book Review: Reconstruction’s Ragged Edge By Steven E. Nash

       The Southern Appalachian Mountains are one of the most frequently misunderstood regions, both culturally and historically, in the United States. Perceptions of the region as backward, generally free of  slavery, loyally Unionist, and sequestered from the rest of the nation were frequent and pervasive in the late nineteenth and into the twentieth … Continue reading Book Review: Reconstruction’s Ragged Edge By Steven E. Nash